Blog

  • Photos
    Posted on 18th August 2014
    15
    Notes

    bookpatrol:

     Future Library: Publication date 2114

     Scottish artist Katie Paterson is a patient women. Her current project Future Library will take 100 years to consummate!  You heard right; a century from inception to completion. Here’s the deal:

    A forest has been planted in Norway, which will supply paper for a special anthology of books to be printed in one hundred years time. Between now and then, one writer every year will contribute a text, with the writings held in trust, unpublished, until 2114. The texts will be held in a specially designed room in the New Public Deichmanske Library in Oslo. Tending the forest and ensuring its preservation for the 100-year duration of the artwork finds a conceptual counterpoint in the invitation extended to each writer: to conceive and produce a work in the hopes of finding a receptive reader in an unknown future

    Paterson has also created a limited edition print which doubles as a certificate that entitles the owner to one complete set of the texts printed on the paper made from the trees after they are fully grown and cut down in 2114.

    Video: Future Library, Katie Paterson from Katie Paterson on Vimeo

    Katie Paterson, Future Library.

  • Link
    Posted on 17th August 2014
    10
    Notes Scientists: they're just like us

    thisisfusion:

    A new survey published in Nature examines why research-based social networks have become so successful among scientists. The survey asked respondents their habits on platforms like Twitter:

    image

    …as well as on sites like ResearchGate, which invites users to share research and build their…

  • Photos
    Posted on 16th August 2014
    21391
    Notes
  • Photo
    Posted on 15th August 2014
    Sacramento. View from the pool. Lying down. Looking up.

    Sacramento. View from the pool. Lying down. Looking up.

  • Photo
    Posted on 15th August 2014
    62
    Notes ucsdhealthsciences:

New Blood: Tracing the Beginnings of Hematopoietic Stem CellsResearchers uncover earliest clues yet to development of cells that produce all adult blood cells
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all other blood cell types, but their development and how their fate is determined has long remained a mystery. In a paper published online this week in Nature, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine elaborate upon a crucial signaling pathway and the role of key proteins, which may help clear the way to generate HSCs from human pluripotent precursors, similar to advances with other kinds of tissue stem cells. 
Principal investigator David Traver, PhD, professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, and colleagues focused on the Notch signaling pathway, a system found in all animals and known to be critical to the generation of HSCs in vertebrates. “Notch signaling between emitting and receiving cells is key to establishing HSC fate during development,” said Traver. “What has not been known is where, when and how Notch signal transduction is mediated.”
Traver and colleagues discovered that the Notch signal is transduced into HSC precursor cells from signal emitting cells in the somite – embryologic tissues that eventually contribute to development of major body structures, such as skeleton, muscle and connective tissues – much earlier in the process than previously anticipated. 
More specifically, they found that JAM proteins, best known for helping maintain tight junctions between endothelial cells to prevent vascular leakage, were key mediators of Notch signaling. When the researchers caused loss of function in JAM proteins in a zebrafish model, Notch signaling and HSCs were also lost. When they enforced Notch signaling through other means, HSC development was rescued.
“To date, it has not been possible to generate HSCs de novo from human pluripotent precursors, like induced pluripotent stem cells,” said Traver. “This has been due in part to a lack of understanding of the complete set of factors that the embryo uses to make HSCs in vivo. It has also likely been due to not knowing in what order each required factor is needed.”
“Our studies demonstrate that Notch signaling is required much earlier than previously thought. In fact, it may be one of the earliest determinants of HSC fate. This finding strongly suggests that in vitro approaches to instruct HSC fate from induced pluripotent stem cells must focus on the Notch pathway at early time-points in the process. Our findings have also shown that JAM proteins serve as a sort of co-receptor for Notch signaling in that they are required to maintain close contact between signal-emitting and signal-receiving cells to permit strong activation of Notch in the precursors of HSCs.” 
The findings may have far-reaching implications for eventual development of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies for diseases like leukemia and congenital blood disorders. Currently, it is not possible to create HSCs from differentiation of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells – pluripotent cells artificially derived from non-pluripotent cells, such as skin cells – that are being used in other therapeutic research efforts.

    ucsdhealthsciences:

    New Blood: Tracing the Beginnings of Hematopoietic Stem Cells
    Researchers uncover earliest clues yet to development of cells that produce all adult blood cells

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all other blood cell types, but their development and how their fate is determined has long remained a mystery. In a paper published online this week in Nature, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine elaborate upon a crucial signaling pathway and the role of key proteins, which may help clear the way to generate HSCs from human pluripotent precursors, similar to advances with other kinds of tissue stem cells. 

    Principal investigator David Traver, PhD, professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, and colleagues focused on the Notch signaling pathway, a system found in all animals and known to be critical to the generation of HSCs in vertebrates. “Notch signaling between emitting and receiving cells is key to establishing HSC fate during development,” said Traver. “What has not been known is where, when and how Notch signal transduction is mediated.”

    Traver and colleagues discovered that the Notch signal is transduced into HSC precursor cells from signal emitting cells in the somite – embryologic tissues that eventually contribute to development of major body structures, such as skeleton, muscle and connective tissues – much earlier in the process than previously anticipated. 

    More specifically, they found that JAM proteins, best known for helping maintain tight junctions between endothelial cells to prevent vascular leakage, were key mediators of Notch signaling. When the researchers caused loss of function in JAM proteins in a zebrafish model, Notch signaling and HSCs were also lost. When they enforced Notch signaling through other means, HSC development was rescued.

    “To date, it has not been possible to generate HSCs de novo from human pluripotent precursors, like induced pluripotent stem cells,” said Traver. “This has been due in part to a lack of understanding of the complete set of factors that the embryo uses to make HSCs in vivo. It has also likely been due to not knowing in what order each required factor is needed.”

    “Our studies demonstrate that Notch signaling is required much earlier than previously thought. In fact, it may be one of the earliest determinants of HSC fate. This finding strongly suggests that in vitro approaches to instruct HSC fate from induced pluripotent stem cells must focus on the Notch pathway at early time-points in the process. Our findings have also shown that JAM proteins serve as a sort of co-receptor for Notch signaling in that they are required to maintain close contact between signal-emitting and signal-receiving cells to permit strong activation of Notch in the precursors of HSCs.” 

    The findings may have far-reaching implications for eventual development of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies for diseases like leukemia and congenital blood disorders. Currently, it is not possible to create HSCs from differentiation of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells – pluripotent cells artificially derived from non-pluripotent cells, such as skin cells – that are being used in other therapeutic research efforts.

  • Photo
    Posted on 14th August 2014
  • Photos
    Posted on 14th August 2014
    10428
    Notes
  • Photo
    Posted on 14th August 2014
    319
    Notes pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 14, 1935: FDR Signs Social Security Act into Law
On this day in 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act, which was originally designed to provide economic security during the Great Depression.  Funded through a 2% payroll tax, the 1935 Social Security Act offered aid for the unemployed, the elderly, children and various state health and welfare programs.
Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Library of Congress

    pbsthisdayinhistory:

    August 14, 1935: FDR Signs Social Security Act into Law

    On this day in 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act, which was originally designed to provide economic security during the Great Depression.  Funded through a 2% payroll tax, the 1935 Social Security Act offered aid for the unemployed, the elderly, children and various state health and welfare programs.

    Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

    Photo: Library of Congress

  • Photo
    Posted on 13th August 2014
    25
    Notes alanfriedman:

A fine solar prominence from August 10th. 

    alanfriedman:

    A fine solar prominence from August 10th. 

  • Photo
    Posted on 13th August 2014
    Tessellations.

    Tessellations.